Helpful "Place Locator" tip for your Hungarian ancestor's village

      Picture this research dilemma scenario for your Hungarian research; You finally found the naturalization records for your great- grandfather and it contains the name of his birthplace. Or you think you found him in the Ellis Island database with a village mentioned in their records. Perhaps you found his American marriage record at the Reformed church and it lists his place of origins. However, when you look at the map or Wikipedia it, it does not come up.

Whose blogging Hungarian family history ?

  In doing Hungarian genealogy, I encountered many wonderful blogs along the way. Many gifted writers generously share their research experiences on blogs. Here are some great bloggers writing about their Hungarian genealogical research. Some have been around a long time; some are new. Some blogs listed here cover their research in Hungary; some write about their genealogical forays in countries that were once part of Hungary, such as Croatia, Slovakia, Romania and other locations.

Using FamilySearch EXPORT function in Slovakian and Hungarian records

So where is the Hungarian census of 1857 ?

We know it exists. This particular census was called the "Josephine " census because it was the census ordered by Emperor Joseph II of Austria - Hungary to count men for military service [1]  We know that some rolls of it are at the National Archives of Hungary. Some are also at Family History Archives because the Genealogical Society of Utah filmed it in 1970.

Do you know what your ancestral home looks like?

 

     When you research all your families as you crawl back in time, do you wanderlust about the places they lived in?  Of course, as we go further back, our wish list of  "travel to ancestral home visits" gets longer.

Keresztszülő ~ Godparents and their genealogical importance

According to a Hungarian - English dictionary, the word - komaasszony - means the godmother of my child;  komám means godfather of my child.

Hungarian Churches in Detroit

            Detroit had, at least, 7 churches in one section to serve the new Hungarian immigrants in the 1890's when they flowed into this metropolis. Now, there is one lone church in the vanished Hungarian section of Detroit called Del Ray on South Street.  Holy Cross was one of the newest parishes formed in 1905 for Hungarians that lived in Del Ray.  It is now the only remaining Hungarian Catholic church in the entire state of Michigan . They still conduct masses in the Magyar language. They also have the Epiphany mass (Vizkereszt) this Sunday, 6th January 2012.

 This photo collection was provided by Diane M. Korzeniewski, OCDS from her Blog, Te Deum Laudamus, and are reproduced with her full permission, and in accordance with her posted provisions which also require a link back to her Blog at http://te-deum.blogspot.com/ . She may be contacted at TeDeumBlog@gmail.com . The photos and copyright remain her property.
 This photo collection was provided by Diane M. Korzeniewski, OCDS from her Blog, Te Deum Laudamus, and are reproduced with her full permission, and in accordance with her posted provisions which also require a link back to her Blog at http://te-deum.blogspot.com/ . She may be contacted at TeDeumBlog@gmail.com . The photos and copyright remain her property.
 This photo collection was provided by Diane M. Korzeniewski, OCDS from her Blog, Te Deum Laudamus, and are reproduced with her full permission, and in accordance with her posted provisions which also require a link back to her Blog at http://te-deum.blogspot.com/ . She may be contacted at TeDeumBlog@gmail.com . The photos and copyright remain her property.

Wiki for Hungary

 

     Folks should be aware that the webinar - WIKI FOR GENEALOGISTS - is a great introduction to the way of the Wiki world in genealogy. It really answers many questions about how versatile wiki can be for genealogists. The ideas are endless and so well presented by the wiki genealogist,  Thomas MacEntee.

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